Jambhala Practice

A year round teaching and practice by Khenpo Namgyal and Lama Kanchha

AIMS

Yellow Jambhala is a male, rotund figure, wearing ornaments and heavenly garments similar to a bodhisattva figure in Buddhist art. The form of Jambhala follows that of a Yaksha figure in Indian art, which is also similar to the appearance of the Four Guardian Kings in Tibetan art. According to the system of the Eleven Iconographic Appearances in Tibetan Art - Jambhala belongs to King Appearance.

CONTENT

Jambhala is a wealth deity. His practices, rituals and meditations are done for the purposes of acquiring wealth - either slowly or quickly. The Tantric origins of Yellow Jambhala begin with the early Tantra texts such as the Siddhaikavira Tantra and the Manjushri Mula Kalpa Tantra. In the Anuttarayoga system Jambhala is found in the Hevajra, Guhyasamaja and Chakrasamvara Tantras. The Hevajra Tantra in particular relies upon Yellow Jambhala, in his two armed form, as the wealth deity specific to practitioners of the Hevajra system.

 

Then the guests of compassion, the beings of the six realms and lastly the guests that have a connection of karmic debt. We should visualize that the entire sky above us is filled with all these invited guests.

Practitioners then visualize that from the fragrant smoke appear limitless offerings of every desirable object that pervade space.

PRACTICE

"Yellow Jambhala with one face and two hands. The right [hand] holds a bijapuraka [fruit] and the left a mongoose with jewels showering down. [With] two feet pressing down on a conch and lotus treasure. Adorned with a blue utpala garland and jewel ornaments." (Konchog Lhundrub, 1497-1557.